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Sea Green Singers - Diggers Song - click on image to print on A4

Bass and Alto sing the tune


The Diggers Song - Gerrard Winstanley
Bass and Alto sing tune
1. (Unison) You noble Diggers all, stand up now, stand up now,
You noble Diggers all, stand up now!
The wasteland to maintain, seeing cavaliers by name
Your digging do disdain, and persons all defame,
Stand up now, stand up now!

2. (Harmony) Your houses they pull down,
stand up now, stand up now,
Your houses they pull down, stand up nowl
Your houses they pull down, to fright poor men in town,
But the gentry must come down, and the poor shall wear the crown,
Stand up now Diggers all!

3. (Unison) 'Gainst lawyers and 'gainst priests,
stand up now, stand up now,
'Gainst lawyers and 'gainst priests, stand up now!
For tyrants they are both, even flat against their oath,
To grant us they are loath, free meat and drink and cloth,
Stand up now, stand up now!

4. (Harmony) With spades and hoes and ploughs,
stand up now, stand up now,
With spades and hoes and ploughs, stand up now!
Your freedom to uphold, seeing cavaliers are bold
To kill you if they could, your rights from you to hold,
Stand up now, diggers all.

Article below from Wikpedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diggers_Song

The "Diggers' Song" (also known as "Levellers and Diggers") is a 17th century ballad, in terms of content, a protest song concerned with land rights, inspired by the Diggers movement, composed by Gerrard Winstanley.

The lyrics were published in 1894 by the Camden Society. It is sung to a version of the family of tunes later used for Sam Hall, Captain Kidd and Admiral John Benbow, which according to Roy Palmer was first printed in 1714. The English band Chumbawamba recorded a version of this song on their 1988 album English Rebel Songs 1381-1914.

It is often thought that "The World Turned Upside Down" (not to be confused with a 17th century ballad of the same title), composed by Leon Rosselson in 1975, is a version of "Diggers' Song". In May 2009 Leon Rosselson corrected this belief in the Guardian newspaper: [May 16th 2009]

" I wrote the song in 1974 ... It's the story of the Digger Commune of 1649 and their vision of the earth as 'a common treasury'. It's become a kind of anthem for various radical groups, particularly since Billy Bragg recorded it [1985], and is not adapted from any other song. The title is taken from Christopher Hill's book about the English revolution."